Tag Archives: Ancient philosophy

Philosophy for the Uninitiated

Detail of The School of Athens by Raffaello Sa...
Detail of The School of Athens by Raffaello Sanzio, 1509, showing Plato (left) and Aristotle (right) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Thanks to TinyJB, missjunebug recently checked out the website/podcast The Partially Examined Life at partiallyexaminedlife.com. What a fun bunch of smarty pants guys. Mark, Seth, Wes, and Dylan are equal parts irreverent, serious, hilarious, analytical, erudite, and absolutely entertaining.

Plus they have great voices. This matters in a podcast! Especially one you plan to listen to on a regular basis.

Readings are recommended with each philosopher (partially) examined, but take it from missjunebug, they are not essential to deriving some useful information that just might improve your understanding of life, meaning, and the monad. (Okay, for that last one you’ll just have to listen to the podcast on Liebniz.)

Here’s what the winsome foursome have to say for themselves on their website:

The Partially Examined Life is a philosophy podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don’t have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we’re talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. 

(missjunebug loves her some writers who know how to use the parenthetical word or two)

In homage to the philosopher who inspires the name of their blog, the boys begin with Plato’s Apology where Socrates makes as strong case for self-examination as Mark Zuckerberg does for selfies on Facebook. If you are a seeker, a questioner, or a wonderer, check out one of the many podcast episodes on partiallyexaminedlife.com. There are over one hundred to choose from or you can do what missjunebug is doing and begin at the beginning with Plato and his man Socrates.

Perhaps, you will come to agree with Plato that “Wonder is the feeling of the philosopher, and philosophy begins in wonder.”